Category Archives: not for the faint of heart

The Marsman Chronicles.

Well, it’s been a long time since I’ve been able to write on this blog, primarily because of the experience I’ll be sharing with you today with this blog entry right now.

Now, why is it called “The Marsman Chronicles”, because this entry is about my experience as an practicum trainee (on-the-job trainee) at Marsman Drysdale Travel Inc. at their UST Inplant office inside the Albertus Magnus Building, so yeah for my internship, I never left the building and the UST campus.

It all began in November where 2 weeks after I went there for the interview, I was finally brought in to train there. 2 weeks later, my co-trainee Denise arrived. At first, we learned the basics from telephone etiquette, browsing e-mails of past work, and simple tasks like reorganizing file cases and all those things. Then came the complex part of the work. For the entire course of my internship, I worked on the Mock Tour Guiding from itinerary proposal to calling and replying to suppliers for the trip. I also got to do a little bit of airline reservation like getting into the stream of Galileo and Abacus CRS (computer reservation system). Then I also did a little bit of documentation for passporting (new applicants and renewals) as well as visa processing primarily to South Korea as we had two groups that went there this semester. However, my primary work was being the back office of the in-plant recording transactions on a daily basis as well as using my capabilities at the computer especially in Adobe Photoshop to design ID’s and luggage tags which were used on the trip.

Primarily my internship was a great experience for me personally and professionally. It was a fun working environment while there and I enjoyed coming to work every time. However, there were times where it wasn’t smooth sailing. There was a time I could have been booted out midway through it all, because of our lack of good performance. But, both of us interns worked our hardest and did a good job as the days passed on!

After 75 working days, the Chronicles came to an end yesterday. So I would first like to thank Mr. Albert Ricacho who was there from the very beginning of my internship until the end, for being a great motivator at the work place. It was fun working with you there. To Ms. Jenny Ylarde for also giving me the inspiration in tough times. To Ms. Lady Lou Pangilinan, once our supervisor for pushing us to do our best at the workplace. As well as to my co-intern Denise, we worked and complimented each other well. Lastly, to the company itself for giving us a complete hands-on experience on the inner workings of the tourism industry.

Photo ©Karl Carandang
 
It is finished!
K-Smoove
 
P.S. Sorry I can’t share all photos during my internship.
Advertisements

Tourism: Not for the faint of heart.

People sometimes would ask me, 
What are you taking up in college?”.
 
I would say Tourism/Travel Management.”
 
Some of the people who would ask me that question would say,  
It’s an easy course. You’re lucky.”
 
This kind of question were asked to me when I was just starting at the university, where I still had little knowledge about the life as a travel management student. I let it go whenever they say that. But now, that I have gotten into the deep waters of my España journey, I have something to say whenever someone would say these words again.


Well, there is a misconception about not only Tourism/Travel Management but also of Hotel & Restaurant Management courses which are under one college in the University of Santo Tomas, which is the College of Tourism and Hospitality Management. Where in one academic year, 2 out of 5 students from the college were able to graduate with honors. Unlike in other colleges where the percentages are well below. Thus creating the perception by those from outside of the college, that the programsare “easy”.

However, these statistics and numbers are not as it seems. Well, because little people may know, but Tourism/Travel Management at the university is as challenging as the other programs of the university like Accounting, Architecture, Engineering, Pharmacy to name a few which have been notable as one of the most difficult courses to take.

Tourism/Travel Management may not have a lot of mathematics and science subjects as other courses, as well as the technicalities of architecture and drawing, the calculations of accounting, or the scientific concepts and skills taught of the sciences and medicine. but it has it’s own set of challenges as do other courses. 

One would be learning foreign languages along the way. In our case, French and German. Studying a foreign language would be our version of complicated mathematics courses like calculus or drawing of plates.

Aside from that a lot of other courses which include Tour Guiding where it tests our knowledge about places at the same time knowing how to deal with tourists on tours, Tour Packaging where we calculate for the cost for trips, Airline Reservations where we learn how to reserve and book flights or other trips, Events Management where we organize our own event, Tourism English (not once, but twice) which means we’re taking six English courses instead of the usual four most of the other students would take, as well as other courses that will be useful when we step into the labor force.

With time well spent studying at the university, I can say with full confidence that Tourism/Travel Management is not for the faint of heart. Because right now, I am currently getting into the more technical courses of Tourism/Travel Management this semester which is dubbed by many as the “most challenging semester” for a Travel Management student. Imagine, six out of the eight courses this semester would have something to do with the technicalities of tourism. Where failure is not an option and the only way to go with is to keep moving forward.

Every program has it’s own set of challenges, we can’t take away the facts that some look easy, while others look hard. However, studying no matter what program you are pursuing will always be a challenge. It takes hard work and dedication to succeed in studies as well as having a fulfilled life.

Next time they’ll ask me that same question. I’ll have something to say about it.

My craft is not for the faint of heart.
K-Smoove